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20131207
20131207
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
of every aspect of what the nsa does. and the way this has been reported, the snowden disclosures have identified areas of legitimate concern. some of it has also been highly sensationalized. and, you know, has been painted in a way that's not accurate. i've said before and i will say again, the nsa actually does a very good job about not engaging in domestic surveillance. not reading people's e-mails. not listening into the content of their phone calls. outside of our borders, the nsa is more aggressive. it's not constrained by laws. part of what we're trying to do the next month or so is having done an independent review, brought in civil libertarians, i'll be proposing some self restraint on the nsa. to initiate reforms that can give people more confidence. but i want everybody to be clear. the people of the nsa generally are looking out for the safety of the american people. they are not interested in reading your e-mails. they are not interested in reading your text messages. and that's not something that's done. we've got a big system of checks and balances including the courts a
to be imposing some self-restraint on the nsa. what does that process and tell entail? >> the president is continuing to review ideas. i think it is important that you noted an important point yesterday. he made important point yesterday that i know he believes deeply. the work done by the nsa, and others in our intelligence agencies, is vital to keeping america and americans safe, as was keeping our ally safe. we cannot lose sight of that. the president said in his comment yesterday, things that reflected and echoed what he said in the past about things that he can do and reforms that we can make a better wise without forgetting that the fundamental mission that is undertaken by our intelligence community is designed to make americans and america safer. >> we understand that he is getting a report yesterday -- next week about the nsa -- >> i don't have any scheduling announcements today. >> the president said he wanted to see immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about
month i debated general counsel of the nsa steward baker and he said between what ed snowden did and what journalists did, once the information is in the hands of journalists it is protected material. a nice reading of our own bbc and the guidelines he laid down in the process, the public interest will weigh heavily and highly in any deliberations he takes. >> >> and what he was engage in, which was distributing the national borders. >> we were cheri in this with the new york times, ordered to stimulated debate, which is vital. >> is their current police investigation into "the guardian"? >> i don't know. communications with you all. >> i have seen scotland yard say they are holding an investigation. in records, as a public record the committee decided to call the head of am i 5 in open session. >> did you have advance notice of the questions asked of you today? >> the general areas of concern that might be covered. the intelligence and security meeting, carefully manicured questions, rehearsed questions, the committee accused of approval for the government, and the cheerleaders
on the tv talk shows. >> i don't know what that show was. nsa, where does that process stand on the restraint? >> it's under way. president is continuing to review ideas and i think it's --ortant that he noted other an important point yesterday. not well said. he made an important point that deeply that the work done by the nsa. the others in the intelligence keeping vital to america and americans safe as well as keeping our allies safe. and we can't lose sight of that. said in his dent comments things reflected what past things we an do and the reforms we can make that are wise without forgetting that the fundamental by our is undertaken intelligence community is make ed to and does americans and americans safer. >> we understand you're going next week about the advisory group he named in the nsa. is that the pivot point on -- >> i don't have any scheduling nnouncements on that issue to provide today. he's actively engaged in the agenda. >> three things the president wanted to see, immigration reform, a farm bill, and a budget. about to leave. any sort of timetable on those
hearing earlier this year. when asked if the nsa collects information on americans, clapper denied it. take a listen. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no, sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are caseses where they could inadvertently perhaps collect but not wittingly. >> well now wisconsin congressman james sensenbrenner, original author of the patriot act, telling the congressional news site the hill that clapper should be prosecuted for lying to congress. >> meanwhile, nelson mandela's family making their first statement since the former south african president's death. say, quote, the pillar of the royal mandela family is no more with us physically, but his spirit is still with us. the anti-apartheid leader died at the age of 95. president obama, as well as former presidents clinton and george w. bush plan to visit south africa next week to attend funeral services for mandela. >>> we are remembering the victims of the attack on pearl harbor 72 years ago today. a 21-gun salute and thousands attending a memo
a particular fascination with the former nsa contractor at one point she believed he would be chosen as time magazine's person of the year as did many other people. but even though walter is routinely granted cent in the top spot on that list. executives at abc later nixed the idea of getting snowed in that honor some people have speculated that the reason he can't take the top spot is because he's not full interview of all that he sat in the scene will only take people they can have access to. snowden is of course currently seeking asylum in russia is not exactly talking to the press but the network spokesperson has already refuted that by saying people are fascinating no matter if the interview them or not the most fascinating decision is not made based on who the interview and so what is known and was snubbed the number one place will remain a mystery. and he continued today with the news of nelson mandela's that mandela guided south africa out of apartheid and into multi racial democracy thereby becoming an international icon of peace and the conciliation. mandela was ninety five years o
to admit they know him. they lied about benghazi, the irs, nsa, fast and furious. nobody believes him anymore. >> uncle omar is not a lie. that's been proven. >> president obama, nephew obama is the liar. >> he's not. by the way, they never asked him two years ago. >> three. >> three years ago from the press office. they never asked him first. this time asked hill and he gave a truthful answer. >> come on. >> one of them that he unequivocally lied about is the video about benghazi. that was a complete fabrication. they arrested a man, used the power and resources of the government to railroad a guy. >> if you want to go to benghazi do you think it's just possible that the government couldn't tell us the whole truth because things were happening in benghazi that were -- >> purposely lied to the us. >> though there are things we shouldn't know and you would support us not knowing p it is a cia action. >> the that never justifies affirmatively lying about a video. >> we didn't lie about a video. what did he lie about? >> said this was a spontaneous -- >> he knew better. they did know bet
. [ applause ] >> so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello, we think ou're doing a great job. in any event, the senators are famous for speaking at great lengths. i won't do that to you today. but let me just say that i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. is senator long still here? senator -- i see pat. pat, raise your hand. senator miller and senator wong was here. i guess he had to step out. but in any event, i was elected governor at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday was in september i matured. i took office when i was 33. i did not serve in the state legislature. i had served as secretary of state. i'd been involved politically. but i had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and the house the way i would like to and i did over the next eight years. and i realized pretty quickly, john, probably the same way in utah, we have a saying in indiana that governor proposes, state legislature, isposes. so i realized we needed to try to find common ground. and i had to challenge right away in my eight yea
now have the nsa, which i understand does something like $3 billion of worldwi--wide eavesdropping. so what we have that's comparable is a f--a flood tide of intelligence which seems to overwhelm the circuitry. what we seem to be lacking is--then and now is careful analy--an--analysis to say, 'well, we've got this tide of intelligence. what direction is it falling in? what do these jigsaw pieces tell us if we can put them together?' that was a failing prior to pearl harbor and obviously a failing now. c-span: vincent astor. what did he do for fdr? >> guest: well, i mentioned a moment ago that the united states didn't go into the intelligence business in a serious way until 1941. we were probably the only world power that didn't have a professional intelligence service. roosevelt relied very heavily prior to, let's say, 1940 on a circle of socialite friends as his sources. there were a group of them who styled themselves the club, and they had taken a shabby apartment on new york's upper east side. they had an unlisted phone number. they had a secret mail drop. it--it--it sounded like t
made by snowden as far as the nsa is concerned. have they affected the dia and your ability. your agency's ability to function as usual prior to the revelations? i don't know if there is anybody that worked at nsa. it's an extraordinary capability. a national capability for our country's national security. the work force and men and women up here are some of the most talented people we have in the intelligence community today. so, you know, they are challenged today because of this incredible outpouring of attention they don't frankly deserve it. the work force doesn't deserve it. they are -- and in all the while that all of this stuff is going on in the news today, they're up there today 24/7. i wouldn't just say up there but global work force on the battle needle afghanistan and many other part of the world working 24/7 to protect our national security. national security agency is a national treasure. now to answer your question, has it affected us? absolutely. will it affect us in the future? absolutely. is what the -- the tragedy of megaproportions? absolutely. it's being deal
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)